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Stay at Burgdorf Hot Springs

Burgdorf offers rustic cabins (see map) for rent. They are all special and boast their own unique history.  All cabins are without running water and electricity, so please be prepared to “camp inside a cabin”. The smaller cabins have either a double or a queen bed and sleep 2 people while the largest cabins sleep up to 6 people.

All cabins have wood stoves, firewood, beds and basic furnishings. However guests must bring their own bedding (Sub 0° recommended for wintertime), cooking needs & lighting needs. Our facilities are rustic, click here to learn more about what you should bring! Please read our Cabin Policies to know what to expect when you rent a cabin.

Check-in is after 3 pm & Check-out is 11 am.

Please call if you will be checking in after 5 pm (Our office closes for the evening @ 5 pm).  We can give you any necessary instructions to help you get settled-in.

As the season and COVID allow, we will also consider opening The White Cabin, Lewis and Clark and three other cabins with larger capacities, the Mary, Margaret and Marie.

Tackle

Tackle, originally “Number 7” until the 1970’s, is one of eight log cabins hired by Jim Harris to be constructed by a Swedish carpenter in the 1930’s for $60 apiece. Legend has it he worked through the winter. It has been refurbished twice, first in the 1970’s by Russel & Benet, and then Doug Mastellar. Russell was a commercial fisherman, hence the name, or it was derived from the horse tackle used for ranching. It is winterized, has a queen bed and a full size bed on the same level, with a loft to store your belongings. This cabin accommodates 4 guests.

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Derail

Derail, originally “Number 2” until the 1970’s, was one of the eight log cabins hired by Jim Harris to be constructed by a Swedish carpenter in the 1930’s for $60 apiece.  Legend has it he worked through the winter. It was rebuilt by Larry & Maggie Bratcher, and then Doc & Joan Harding in the 1970’s. This cabin served as a schoolhouse for children living in Burgdorf during the winter. The history of the name is lost, but we are sure you can come up with your own story. It is winterized, has one queen bed and accommodates two guests.

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Laurel Ann

Laurel Ann, originally “Number 5” until the mid 1970’s, is also one of the eight log cabins hired by Jim Harris to be constructed by a Swedish carpenter in the 1930’s for $60 apiece.  Legend has it he worked through the winter.  It was reconstructed in the 1970’s by Howdy Carlton, and subsequently Stewart Warren, and is named for his amazing wife Laurel Ann, a gifted musician and seamstress.  We can still hear her clear, clarion voice.
It is winterized and there are two full beds as a bunk bed, and can accommodate four guests.

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The Castle

The Castle, likely constructed in the 1920’s, is an open, airy, gracious two story log cabin with a large porch and commanding view of the meadow and pool. It is winterized and can accommodate 6 guests and has two queen beds and three full beds.

 

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Long Tom

The Long Tom is one of the oldest cabins, possibly named after a trapper in the 1800’s. It evokes the pioneer spirit, constructed of logs, it is very homey and warm, with a low ceiling and a commanding view of the meadow and pool. It was rebuilt by Rick Mallory and Stewart Warren.  It is winterized, has one queen bed, and accommodates two.

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Busby

Busby is named for Michael Busby who rebuilt the cabin in the 1970’s. He added most of the craft touches. It was originally “Number 8” up until the early 1970’s as it was one of the eight log cabins hired by Jim Harris to be constructed by a Swedish carpenter in the 1930’s for $60 apiece. Legend has it he worked through the winter.  It is a winterized cabin and accommodates two, with a queen bed.

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Broken Wing

Broken Wing, originally just “Number 4” until the mid 1970’s, was one of the eight log cabins hired by Jim Harris to be constructed by a Swedish carpenter in the 1930’s for $60 apiece.   Legend has it he worked on it throughout the winter.   It was then reconstructed by Brent Stauff in the 1970’s.  Unfortunately, the source of the name has been obscured in time.  It is winterized, furnished with one queen bed and accommodates two.

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Dutch

Dutch was named after Dutch Hinkley, a long time Secesh and Warren resident, who was hired to assist with several construction projects in the 1980’s & 90’s, including the moving of this cabin from McCall. It was the back porch for the Saltzer Cabin, also moved up from the end of Payette Lake. It’s just across from the store and the pool, ideal for those who prefer easier access.  It is winterized, has one full bed and accommodates two.

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Hornet's Nest

The Hornet’s Nest is one of our older cabins, likely built around 1900. It is of grand design with an upstairs. The walls are log with inner frame walls, thick and filled with sawdust for insulation. The source of the name is unknown with certainty but can probably be guessed. Legend has it that it served as an ice house for the original hotel. It is winterized, has two queen beds, two full and one twin bed and can accommodate 6 people.

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Lewis & Clark

The Lewis and Clark, obviously named after the famous explorers, although the reason is uncertain.  It was likely constructed in the 1920’s.  It is a cute, cozy log cabin, with a bit more private location.  It was refurbished by Rod Dow in the 1980’s.  It is winterized, has one queen bed and will accommodate two guests.

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Little Red Cabin

The Little Red Cabin, misnamed as the “First Cabin”. It was a very early structure built by Fred Burgdorf circa 1870. It boasts fine log craftsmanship, with hewn logs and self-locking, self-draining corner notches. It is close to the store and pool with easy access to the parking lot. It is winterized, has a full bed which accommodates two.

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Little White Cabin

Little White Cabin was a watchmaker’s shop along Warren Wagon Road in McCall. It was moved to Burgdorf in the 1940’s by Bill Harris to accommodate his mother, Louie Harris. It retains the 40’s charm which is quite different than the log cabins. It is not winterized. It is furnished with a queen bed, and accommodates two.

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Mary

The Mary: one of three similar cabins on the west end of town, with a commanding view of the meadow, and a large porch. These log cabins were constructed in the 1930’s. It is not winterized, has a loft, with one queen bed downstairs, and two twin beds upstairs, and can accommodate 6 guests.

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Margaret

The Margaret: One of the three log “sisters” constructed in the 1930’s. It also has an expansive view overlooking the meadow, and a large porch. It is not winterized, has two queen beds, and can accommodate four guests.

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Marie

The Marie: The westernmost cabin on the property, the third log “sister”, constructed in the 1930’s, it affords privacy and a view of the meadow and a large porch. It is not winterized, can accommodate four guests with two queen beds.

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What to expect? What to bring? Get your answers here...